Legal Info

We cannot provide legal advice, however you may find the links below useful as a guide. Please note that the linked information is only valid for UK customers, international customers must satisfy themselves that they are selling knives within the law.

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List of offensive weapons

Section 141 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 provides that it is an offence to manufacture, sell or hire, offer for sale or hire, expose or have in his possession for the purpose of sale or hire of or lending or giving to any other person certain specified weapons. The Criminal Justice Act (Offensive Weapons) Order 1988 (S.I 1998/2019) (as amended) provides that the following are specified weapons for the purpose of section 141:

  1. a knuckleduster, that is, a band of metal or other hard material worn on one or more fingers, and designed to cause injury, and any weapon incorporating a knuckleduster;
  2. a swordstick, that is, a hollow walking-stick or cane containing a blade which may be used as a sword;
  3. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘handclaw’, being a band of metal or other hard material from which a number of sharp spikes protrude, and worn around the hand;
  4. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘belt buckle knife’, being a buckle which incorporates or conceals a knife;
  5. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘push dagger’, being a knife, the handle of which fits within a clenched fist and the blade of which protrudes from between two fingers;
  6. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘hollow kubotan’, being a cylindrical container containing a number of sharp spikes;
  7. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘footclaw’, being a bar of metal or other hard material from which a number of sharp spikes protrude, and worn strapped to the foot;
  8. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘shuriken’, ‘shaken’ or ‘death star’, being a hard non-flexible plate having three or more sharp radiating points and designed to be thrown;
  9. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘balisong’ or ‘butterfly knife’, being a blade enclosed by its handle, which is designed to split down the middle, without the operation of a spring or other mechanical means, to reveal the blade;
  10. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘telescopic truncheon’, being a truncheon which extends automatically by hand pressure applied to a button, spring or other device in or attached to its handle;
  11. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘blowpipe’ or ‘blow gun’, being a hollow tube out of which hard pellets or darts are shot by the use of breath;
  12. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘kusari gama’, being a length of rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at one end to a sickle;
  13. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘kyoketsu shoge’, being a length of rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at one end to a hooked knife;
  14. the weapon sometimes known as a ‘manrikigusari’ or ‘kusari’, being a length of rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at each end to a hard weight or hand grip;
  15. a disguised knife, that is any knife which has a concealed blade or concealed sharp point and is designed to appear to be an everyday object of a kind commonly carried on the person or in a handbag, briefcase, or other hand luggage (such as a comb, brush, writing instrument, cigarette lighter, key, lipstick or telephone);
  16. a stealth knife, that is a knife or spike, which has a blade, or sharp point, made from a material that is not readily detectable by apparatus used for detecting metal and which is not designed for domestic use or for use in the processing, preparation or consumption of food or as a toy;
  17. a straight, side-handled or friction-lock truncheon (sometimes known as a baton);
  18. a sword with a curved blade of 50 centimetres or over in length; and for the purposes of this sub-paragraph, the length of the blade shall be the straight line distance from the top of the handle to the tip of the blade.

The prohibition does not apply to weapons of the above description which are antiques. For these purposes a weapon is an antique if it was manufactured more than 100 years before the date of any alleged offence having been committed.

Section 141(4) provides that the importation of a weapon to which section 141 applies is prohibited. Breach of this prohibition is an offence under section 50 (2) and (3) of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979.


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